CURRENT LAB MEMBERS




LAB DIRECTOR:

Karen Rudolph, Ph.D.

| CV | Publications

Karen Rudolph is a Professor of Psychology in the Developmental Program. She received her PhD in Clinical Psychology at UCLA and completed her clinical internship at the Neuropsychiatric Institute and Hospital (now the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior) at UCLA. The major goal of Dr. Rudolph's research is to understand why some youth are more vulnerable than others to the development of psychopathology, with a focus on adolescence as a stage of particular sensitivity. To accomplish this goal, her research considers how personal attributes, developmental changes, and the social contexts in which youth live contribute to psychopathology, particularly depression, and how these risks can be counterbalanced by protective resources. She has authored over 100 publications, and has been the recipient of several awards, including a William T. Grant Faculty Scholars Award, a James McKeen Cattell Award, and an Arnold O. Beckman Award. In her spare time, she enjoys swimming, hiking, and hanging out with her husband, kids, and cocker spaniel.




LAB MANAGER:



Jillian Dodson

Jillian Dodson joined the Family Studies Lab as the project coordinator in August 2020, after graduating from UNC Chapel Hill. As an undergraduate, Jillian worked as a research assistant for the Peer Relations Lab and the FPG Child Development Institute. Her research interests include understanding the risk and protective factors associated with childhood and adolescent psychopathology among underserved youths.



GRADUATE STUDENTS:



Megan Davis

Megan Davis is a 5th year doctoral student in clinical/community psychology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She received her BA from the University of Chicago and her MA from the University of Illinois. She is interested in understanding how peer and environmental stress can affect adolescent neural and emotional development, and how this might put some youth at risk for developing psychological disorders like anxiety and depression during this period. The goal of this research is to better understand why some youth are more sensitive to the effects of adverse social experiences, and to identify factors that support better regulation of emotion. Ultimately, this research can be used to improve efforts to prevent and treat symptoms of anxiety and depression during adolescence.


Haina Modi

Haina Modi is a doctoral student in the developmental division of psychology. Before joining the lab in the fall of 2016, she received a B.S. at the University of Houston and worked as a full-time research assistant at the UTHealth Center of Excellence on Mood Disorders. The current focus of her research is to examine how a confluence of factors, such as parent characteristics, adversity, and temperamental traits all contribute to the development of emotion processing during adolescence. Using fMRI, she also studies how these behavioral processes unfold at the neural level, and whether differences in neural activity across adolescence can predict risk for psychopathology.




Haley Skymba

Haley Skymba is a doctoral student in the clinical/community division of psychology at UIUC. Prior to joining the lab, she received her BS from Moravian College and worked as a junior specialist at the TCAN lab at UC Davis. Broadly, she is interested in understanding how early life experiences of peer and family adversity can impact emotional development in children and adolescents. She has a specific interest in the influence of such experiences on emotion regulation skills and executive functioning at both behavioral and neural levels. Her research ultimately aims to examine how alterations in these processes are related to, or can predict, internalizing symptoms (i.e., depression and anxiety) in adolescence.




Pearl Ye

Zihua (Pearl) Ye is a doctoral student in the developmental division of psychology. She previously earned a B.A. from Rice University in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences and a M.A. from the University of Chicago. Before joining the lab, she worked as a full-time research associate at the CAR lab (currently at USC). Broadly, she is interested in adopting a multimodal and developmental framework to investigate the contribution of environmental, interpersonal, and biological processes to emerging gender differences in psychopathology. She is particularly interested in understanding how early adversity, youths' development of emotion functioning and stress response systems, and parental factors interact to affect risks of developing depression among adolescents.




Rebekah Clapham

Rebekah Clapham is a first-year doctoral student in the Clinical-Community division of psychology. She previously earned a B.A. from Skidmore College in Psychology. Before joining the lab, Rebekah worked as a full-time research coordinator in the Risk Behaviors Lab at Western Kentucky University. Broadly, she is interested in understanding risk factors for emotion regulation difficulties that contribute to self-harm outcomes, such as suicide and NSSI. She is particularly interested in understanding how lack of emotion regulation skills interacts with internalizing and externalizing symptoms, as well as stress response systems to affect the development of self-harm outcomes among adolescents.



UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS:


Cheyenne Petersen



Cheyenne Petersen is currently a senior studying Psychology. She has been in the Family Studies Lab since March 2019 and has enjoyed learning more about the research process. Cheyenne is interested in developmental and clinical psychology, and is considering pursuing a career in school psychology or sport psychology. Outside of the lab, she is a part of the Illinois Rowing Club and enjoys exercising and reading.





Lizzie MacDonald



Lizzie MacDonald is currently a senior studying Clinical/Community Psychology and Human Development & Family Studies. She hopes to pursue a graduate degree in Clinical Psychology with a focus on how psychopathology develops in childhood and adolescence. She is especially interested in pursuing a career in clinical research aimed at developing interventions to optimize mental health at these ages. Lizzie joined the Family Studies Lab in October 2019. Outside of the lab, she is the Academic Excellence chair of her sorority and sings in the University Chorus. She also enjoys listening to music, FaceTiming her dog, and watching Netflix.




Jasmine Bigelow



Jasmine Bigelow is currently a junior studying Developmental Psychology with minors in Philosophy and Journalism. She joined the Family Studies Lab in the Spring Semester of 2021. She is passionate about studying sibling differences and how parenting practices affect the development of adolescent personality. Outside of the lab, Jasmine plays flute in the University Concert Band and volunteers with the Alpha Phi Omega fraternity. She also loves reading, going to the gym, and thrift shopping.





Julia Friedland



Julia is a senior studying Clinical/Community Psychology and Social Work, and has been a part of the Family Studies Lab since January of 2021. Interested in pursuing a career in therapy, Julia spends time volunteering as a crisis text-line counselor, and has loved learning about clinical research during her time in the lab. Outside of the lab, Julia enjoys exercising, reading, and listening to music.






Julia Morrison



Julia is currently a senior studying Developmental Psychology. She is hoping to pursue a graduate degree in Social Work and then a career as a children's therapist. Outside of the lab, she is a part of the Illinois Women's Soccer Club and the president of the UIUC Child Life Association.



FAMILY STUDIES LAB


University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
603 E Daniel Street, Room 60
Champaign, IL 61820

    Email: fslillinois@gmail.com

  • 217-244-9385